Clinical OMICS

JAN-FEB 2017

Healthcare magazine for research scientists, labs, pathologists, hospitals, cancer centers, physicians and biopharma companies providing news articles, expert interviews and videos about molecular diagnostics in precision medicine

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10 Clinical OMICs January/February 2017 www.clinicalomics.com I think it is fair to say we are headed for uncertain times when it comes to both the federal regulation of the biomedical R&D community, and how much federal funding may be available for life sciences research. While the healthcare and biomedical community widely hailed the passage in December of the 21 st Cen- tury Cures Act—a rare piece of legislation that enjoyed broad, bipartisan support—recent activity in Congress could cause many to wonder exactly where the prior- ities of Trump administration may lie. With the passage of the law came significant, long-term funding of three major research programs: the Cancer Moonshot, the Precision Medicine Ini- tiative, and the BRAIN Initiative. In total, the new law promises to provide $4.8 billion in additional revenue to the NIH over 10 years to continue these three projects. Critics, including Senators Bernie Sanders (I. VT), Elizabeth Warren (D. MA), and Jeff Merkley (D. OR), point out that provisions in the law to stream- line the FDA significantly loosen regulatory standards and could potentially put patients at risk. In addition, the new money promised the NIH is not nearly enough to make up for what has been a 20% decline in NIH funding (in inflation-adjusted dollars) since 2003. Critics, including Senators Bernie Sanders (I. VT), Elizabeth Warren (D. MA), and Jeff Merkley (D. OR), point out that provisions in the law to stream- line the FDA, significantly loosen regulatory standards, and potentially could put patients at risk. In addition, the new money promised to the NIH is not nearly enough to make up for what has been a 20% decline in NIH funding (in inflation adjusted dollars) since 2003. Whether you are a critic or a fan of the new law, there is no way to know how much of it will actually come to pass. The first indication of this came amid early January efforts of the new Congress to repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA). On passage of "Cures," many in the mental health treatment community were ecstatic over provisions that would strengthen the commit- ment for mental health parity with physical health. The problem is, a repeal of ACA would strip much of that away and result in a cut in funding for mental health insurance coverage. The incoming Trump administration has left most in a fog, wondering exactly where he stands on many issues. And particularly on matters of sci- ence, which he barely mentioned—aside from climate change—during the election. For these reasons, only time, and the governance of the new administra- tion, will tell whether or not Cures was simply a feel-good moment during a lame-duck session, or a significant new law that portends significant change in funding health and the life sciences. —Chris Anderson, Editor in Chief 21st Century Cures, or Same Old, Same Old? Chris Anderson, Editor in Chief Publisher & CEO MARY ANN LIEBERT President MARIANNE RUSSELL Group Publisher SANDE GIACCONE (sgiaccone@clinicalomics.com) Editor in Chief CHRIS ANDERSON (canderson@clinicalomics.com) Managing Editor TAMLYN L. OLIVER (toliver@clinicalomics.com) Commercial Director BILL LEVINE Production Editor ROBERT M. REIS Senior Editor KEVIN MAYER Technical Editor JEFFREY S. BUGULISKIS, Ph.D. Senior News Editor ALEX PHILIPPIDIS Associate Editor STEVEN HERNACKI Contributing Editors MEGHAAN FERREIRA, DIANA KWON, DIANA MANOS Art Director JAMES LAMBO Online Product Manager THOMAS MATHEW Associate Director of Brand Marketing JENNIFER GATTI Online Coordinator KATHERINE VUKSANAJ Design & Layout NORA WERTZ Advertising Sales Manager DENIS SEGER (dseger@clinicalomics.com) Sales Administrator FALLON MURPHY Advertising Material WANDA SANCHEZ (wsanchez@liebertpub.com) Clinical OMICs Advisory Board DANIEL H. FARKAS, Ph.D., HCLD Chief Clinical Laboratory Officer, Celmatix JEFFREY GIBBS, J.D. Director, Hyman, Phelps, and McNamara PETER HARRSCH, Ph.D. Executive Clinical/Forensic Specialist, Waters Corp. ROGER KLEIN, M.D., J.D. Medical Director, Molecular Pathology, Cleveland Clinic JASON PARK, M.D., Ph.D. Assistant Professor, Dept. of Pathology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center STEPHEN C. PEIPER, M.D. Professor & Chair, Dept. of Pathology, Anatomy & Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University AMIT RASTOGI Senior Vice President, Strategy, Growth, and Innovation, Inova DAVID SMITH, Ph.D. Professor of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic KIMBERLY STRONG, Ph.D. Director, Program in Genomics and Ethics, Medical College of Wisconsin LARRY WORDEN Vice President and Senior Partner, Market Diagnostics International The views, opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations set forth in any article in Clinical OMICs are solely those of the authors of those articles and do not necessarily reflect the views, policy, or position of Clinical OMICs, its Publisher, or its editorial staff and should not be attributed to any of them. All advertisements are subject to review by the Publisher. The acceptance of advertisements does not constitute an endorsement of the product or service advertised. Clinical OMICs (ISSN-2334-1351) is published online bimonthly by GEN Publishing, 140 Huguenot St., 3rd Floor, New Rochelle, NY 10801-5215. For subscription information go to: www.clinicalomics.com Copyright © 2017 by GEN Publishing, New Rochelle, NY

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