Clinical OMICS

SEP-OCT 2018

Healthcare magazine for research scientists, labs, pathologists, hospitals, cancer centers, physicians and biopharma companies providing news articles, expert interviews and videos about molecular diagnostics in precision medicine

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www.clinicalomics.com September/October 2018 Clinical OMICs 45 France Génomique (Médicine France Génomique 2025 or French Plan for Genomic Medicine 2025) FRANCE France launched its public genomics initiative in 2016, saying it would invest €670 million ($782 million) over the first five years, including €230 million ($268.5 million) from the corpo- rate sector, toward a network that will encompass 12 genomic sequencing centers or "platforms" and two centers specializ- ing in genomic know-how and data analysis. France Génomique's progress to date includes eight sequencing platforms that have emerged, as have another 12 platforms specializing in bioinformatics. A Big Data comput- ing center, the TGCC (Très Grand Centre de Calcul), was estab- lished at the CEA (French Commission for Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies). Within TGCG is the Computer Centre for Research and Technology, which has configured an exten- sion dedicated to the needs of France Génomique users. France Génomique intends to grow France into a leader in genomic medicine, integrate genomic medicine into routine patient care, and establish a genomic medicine industry to fuel economic growth. By 2020, France aims to have increased its annual sequencing capacity to 235,000 genomes—of which 175,000 are to come from cancer patients, and the remaining 60,000 from rare disease patients. Cancer, rare dis- eases, and diabetes are the initiative's initial dis- ease areas of focus, with other common diseases added to the mix by 2020. "Genomic medicine is a revolution in the area of care and prevention," declared Yves Levy, chairman and CEO of Inserm and chairman of the National Alliance for Life Sciences and Health (Aviesan), a stakeholder coalition of science and biomedical research centers that oversees the French Plan for Genomic Medicine 2025. "France must find a way to achieve this revolution, and take its place among the leaders." Earlier this year, Inserm and Aviesan joined Genomics England, which oversees the U.K.'s 100,000 Genomes Project, in articulating a joint vision for the countries of becoming nothing less than the most advanced and competitive genom- ics research and healthcare systems in the world. Estonia launched its Personalized Medicine Programme in 2016, and began its most recent initiative in April, when it marked its official effort to recruit and genotype an additional 100,000 participants for the Estonian Biobank. Estonians are invited to participate in genome-wide genotyping that will be translated into personalized reports for use in everyday medical practice through the national e-health portal. The program was initiated "in order to boost the devel- opment of personalized medicine in Estonia and thus contribute to the advancement of preventive healthcare," Jevgeni Ossinovski, Minister of Health and Labour, said in a statement. Estonia's government has allocated €5 million ($5.8 mil- lion) this year for the initiative, which is a joint project of Estonia's Ministry of Social Affairs, the National Institute for Health Development, and the Estonian Genome Center of the University of Tartu. The National Institute is coordinating the project while the genome cen- ter has maintained and studied the DNA of the nation's first biobank participants, numbering more than 50,000. That initial cohort of 51,535 gene donors (≥18 years of age) closely reflects the age, sex, and geographical dis- tribution of the Estonian population, according to the genome center. Among the program participants Estonians represent 83%, Russians 14%, and other nationalities 3%. Information from the Biobank is being linked with national registries and hospital databases in order to obtain updated pheno- typic information, including endpoints and nonfatal events. Personalized Medicine Programme ESTONIA Magnilion / Getty Images

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