Clinical OMICS

JAN-FEB 2019

Healthcare magazine for research scientists, labs, pathologists, hospitals, cancer centers, physicians and biopharma companies providing news articles, expert interviews and videos about molecular diagnostics in precision medicine

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40 Clinical OMICs January/February 2019 www.clinicalomics.com New AML Therapies O ver the last 40 years, there has been a pau- city of new drugs for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML)—one of the most com- mon types of leukemia in adults. But, then came 2017, and the approval of four new drugs by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA.) 2018 fol- lowed suit with more drug approvals and the prediction that more will follow suit in 2019, with several promising drugs in the develop- ment pipeline. But, why the recent explosion in new treatment options for this form of cancer? Experts point to genomics and the next-gener- ation sequencing revolution as one of the reasons for the recent advances. Ravi Majeti M.D., Ph.D. professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Hematology Cancer Institute at Stanford Univer- sity told Clinical OMICs that "AML is undergoing a revolution from a clinical point of view" stating that "genomic analysis of AML has identified a number of mutations that have prognostic and/ or therapeutic value in AML. These genomic findings have played a pivotal role in the devel- opment of novel agents for AML, exemplified by the mutant IDH-specific inhibitors and the FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors." Indeed, out of the four new therapies approved in 2017, two are molecularly targeted therapies approved for patients with specific genetic muta- tions. And, drugs that are specific for genetic mutations have not stopped there. A week after two new drugs glasdegib (Daurismo) and venetoclax (Venclexta)) were FDA approved in November 2018, the agency approved gilteritinib (Xospata) for treating patients whose AML tests positive for a mutation in the FLT3 gene. These mutation-specific treatments are, as JULIANNA LEMIEUX Senior Editor Our Editors Pick Three Events from the Past Year They Believe Will Leave a Lasting Legacy Westend61 / Getty Images 2018 Year In Review nicolas_ / E+ / Getty Images bestbrk / iStock / Getty Images

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