Clinical OMICS

JAN-FEB 2019

Healthcare magazine for research scientists, labs, pathologists, hospitals, cancer centers, physicians and biopharma companies providing news articles, expert interviews and videos about molecular diagnostics in precision medicine

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www.clinicalomics.com January/February 2019 Clinical OMICs 48 Industry Events Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) Marco Island, FL, February 27–March 2 Advances in Genome Biology and Technology (AGBT) is one of the preeminent genome science and technology con- ferences where prominent researchers, leaders and inno- vators meet to announce new discoveries, cutting edge breakthroughs and to collaborate. As a recognized corner- stone for the genomics research community, AGBT pro- vides a forum for exchanging information about the latest advances in DNA sequencing technologies, experimental and analytical approaches for genomic studies, and their myriad applications. The meeting includes daytime plenary sessions featuring invited speakers and abstract-selected talks that highlight cutting-edge research across the broad genomics landscape. Evening concurrent sessions includes experimental and computational approaches for effectively utilizing the latest DNA sequencing technologies. Molecular Med Tri-Con San Francisco, March 10–15 Join more than 3,700 drug discovery and development and diagnostic professionals from around the world at the International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference (Molecu- lar Med Tri-Con) at the Moscone Center in San Francisco. Since its debut in 1993, the conference has become one of the world's leading international events in the field of drug dis- covery, development and diagnostics. Spanning five days, the 2019 Tri-Conference includes talks, including case stud- ies and joint partner presentations, and will feature more 500 industry and academic experts discussing themes of cancer research, big data, molecular diagnostics, precision medicine, rare diseases, data science, human microbiome, point-of-care diagnostics, infectious diseases, among others. ACMG Annual Clinical Genetics Meeting Seattle, April 2–6 Hosted by the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG), the meeting offers more than 3,000 members of the medical genetics community a networking and educational venue to learn the about latest research, therapies and practical implementation. Attendees can earn continuing education credits over the four-day conference from a variety of different formats including plenary ses- sions, concurrent scientific sessions, workshops, satellite sessions, and platform presentations. Sessions will focus on the latest discoveries of the etiology and the pathogenesis of genetic disorders, the latest developments in genetic test- ing and screening, the laboratory's role in the diagnosis of genetic disorders, the treatment of genetic disorders in chil- dren and adults, and the delivery of genetic services, among others. This year also features the ACMG/Society of Inher- ited Metabolic Disorders (SIMD) Joint Session on Saturday, April 6, an event that happens only once every four years. BioIT World Boston, April 16–18 The Bio-IT World Conference & Expo is the ideal confluence of informatics applications and enabling technologies that will help attendees cut through the hype. From blockchain, AI, and machine learning, to data science, deep learning, edge, and IoT, educational sessions will show how these technologies and others help drive biomedical research, drug discovery & development, and clinical and healthcare initiatives. The three-day event attracts more than 3,400 life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT profes- sionals from more than 40 countries. This year 's program includes 185 exhibitors, 18 parallel conference tracks, and 14 pre-conference workshops, featuring more 260 present- ers representing industry and academia. Presentation top- ics include next-gen sequencing informatics; data transfer; edge computing; AI track in both genomics and the broader healthcare setting; data visualization and exploration tools; cloud computing; and blockchain in pharma, R&D and healthcare, among others. Agor2012 / iStock / Getty Images

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