Clinical OMICS

MAY-JUN 2018

Healthcare magazine for research scientists, labs, pathologists, hospitals, cancer centers, physicians and biopharma companies providing news articles, expert interviews and videos about molecular diagnostics in precision medicine

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Precision Medicine 46 Clinical OMICs May/June 2018 www.clinicalomics.com ics especially, because we are never going to have billions of genomes sequenced," said Otte. "Most of the AI engines out there that are being built assume large datasets. That is just never going to be the case for health- care. So anyone using existing AI tech- nologies for this purpose is likely not going to have much success." At N-of-One the view is a bit dif- ferent, but it revolves both around the amount of data required and also the accuracy of the data, which is why the company employees its host of Ph.D.s and research scientists to annotate the data it leverages for clinical decision support. In terms of using AI for highly pre- cise cancer care, Cournoyer isn't con- vinced it is ready for prime time. "We went from AI winning at Jeop- ardy, to suddenly wanting it to pro- vide information for highly targeted cancer care," she said. "That's too far, too fast." "I never want to come off as not supporting AI, because I do think there is a way here. We are going to have massive datasets eventually. We just need the right datasets and I don't think we have the right datasets yet," Cournoyer concluded. Sanford Health to Power Genomic Cancer Care at Ireland's Hermitage Medical Christine M. Cournoyer, CEO, N-of-One (continued from previous page) Cancer patients at Hermitage Medical Clinic in Ireland will soon have access to the clinical methods of Sanford Health that will leverage the North Dakota health system's expertise in genomic profiling to inform more pre- cise cancer treatment. "As part of its strategic intent in the development of research and inno- vation, the Hermitage Medical Clinic has signed an agreement on Genomic Cancer Testing with Sanford Health, one of the largest health systems in the world. Through this collaboration we are now able to bring patients, in Ireland, a world-class Genomic Can- cer Testing service," said its Chief Executive, Eamonn Fitzgerald, in a prepared statement. Under the agreement, Hermitage Medical physicians will launch a clini- cal program to discover how genomic profiling patient tumors might lead to more targeted and precise cancer treatment for patients. The program is modeled after Sanford Health's Genetic Exploration of the Molec- ular Basis of Malignancy in Adults (GEMMA) and Community Oncology Use of Molecular Profiling to Person- alize the Approach to Specialized Can- cer Treatment at Sanford (COMPASS) programs, which are studying the use of molecular testing to personalize cancer treatment and measuring asso- ciated patient outcomes. "This is just another way we are try- ing to make a difference around the world," said Jonathon Bleeker, M.D., an oncologist with Sanford Health. "Our ability to collaborate with the providers who treat patients at this clinic will help advance treatment options in Ireland." The Sanford program also makes a genetic tumor board from Sanford available to the care team at Hermit- age via video conference. The board will work in concert with Hermitage physicians to help create personalized care plans the leverage the informa- tion of each patient's genomic test. "We know from experience that our tumor board and our use of genomic medicine in cancer makes a difference in developing treatment plans for patients," said Dan Blue, M.D., exec- utive vice president of Sanford World Clinic, in a press release. The collaboration is a part of a planned expansion of Sanford World Clinic, Sanford Health's interna- tional health care arm, which is now deployed in nine countries with more than 30 locations. Sanford World Clinic also announced new initiatives in New Zealand, Vietnam, Costa Rica and South Africa. It already has work- ing clinics in Ghana and China, and also owns a minority stake in a clinic in Germany. Paper Boat Creative / Getty Images

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